Tesla Motors, From Automobile to Electric Vehicle


Tesla motors has been around for a long time, but very few people had heard of them until they made a huge splash in Silicon Valley by producing an electric car that could travel over 200 miles without recharging.The car is capable as charge from 0% to 100% in under an hour. Their product has become a trend of the wealthy who can afford the $80,000-$120,000 price-tag and want to display their environmental friendliness. The CEO of Tesla, Elon Musk, has been working incredibly hard to implement company goals to achieve his vision that may become the future of road transportation.

The main goals of the company focus both on increasing their market share, and increasing access to charging stations across America. To increase market share, the company has been focused on building car models that are not limited to the wealthy. Tesla wants to produce an all electric vehicle that costs about $40,000, a reasonable price-tag for the average American consumer. This could have a substantial impact on the carbon dioxide emissions from cars throughout the US. The company has also focused on increasing the availability of these electric cars in as many states as possible as well as immediate international expansion. Currently, there are only two states left in the union in which a Tesla cannot be purchased. Charging stations were the most difficult problem that Tesla had to deal with. Implementing stations in a large enough quantity to allow the car to be driven across the country was a goal Tesla has only recently realized. The more available these cars and the charging stations become, the faster America can resolve its dependence on oil. In addition to it’s fabulous growth, Tesla has recently released their patents on the battery technology, allowing other companies to use their designs to build future electric cars. Their desire to improve the planet rather than just their company wealth is clearly evident by their actions.

There is no doubt that the use of electricity in cars is much cleaner than combustion, but the largest problem Tesla cars face in creating a greener world is: where does the electricity come from? Unfortunately, a large portion of the electricity available on the grid is created using coal power plants. These supply both homes and businesses. A recent report has shown that some of the older model Tesla cars had a “vampire load”; electricity that drains from the car even when it was not running. This means that a Tesla car will actively expend electricity even when its not running, a complete waste. If that electricity was made using a coal power plant, unnecessary noxious fumes are being poured into the atmosphere without providing any use for the humans who have purchased it.

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4 responses to “Tesla Motors, From Automobile to Electric Vehicle

  1. I appreciate that you acknowledged the negative aspect of powering electric cars. While driving an electric car reduces the guilt of pollution on the customer’s end, it increases coal burning “behind the scenes” to produce the energy to power these cars. To combat this, Tesla has incorporated solar panels into their Supercharger stations. While I think that this is a step in the right direction I do not believe that solar panels are enough to charge multiple cars, especially if Tesla becomes a common household brand.

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    • Will limited access to charging stations and extremely high prices impact Tesla’s scalability? Can they ever truly compete with traditional cars on a large scale and become “a common brand”?

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  2. I think Musk’s decision to release the Telsa patents was one of the most exciting things to happen this year! As you said, this will spur investment in new infrastructure that supports electric cars and therefore increase usage. It will be exciting to see what happens next!

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